Exhibit Hall (AFS)

New Books

Featured New Books

Overthrowing the Queen

Telling Stories of Welfare in America

by Tom Mould

Published by: Indiana University Press

In 1976, Ronald Reagan hit the campaign trail with an extraordinary account of a woman committing massive welfare fraud. The story caught fire and a devastating symbol of the misuse government programs was born: the Welfare Queen. Overthrowing the Queen examines these legends of fraud and abuse while bringing to light personal stories of hardship and hope told by cashiers, bus drivers, and business owners; politicians and aid providers; and, most important, aid recipients themselves. Together these stories reveal how the seemingly innocent act of storytelling can create not only powerful stereotypes that shape public policy, but also redemptive counter-narratives that offer hope of a more accurate, fair, and empathetic view of poverty in America today. Overthrowing the Queen tackles perceptions of welfare recipients while proposing new approaches to the study of oral narrative that extend far beyond the study of welfare, poverty, and social justice.

Chicago Folklore Prize: Tom Mould, Overthrowing the Queen: Telling Stories of Welfare in America (2020)

The oldest international award recognizing excellence in folklore scholarship, the Chicago Folklore Prize is awarded to the author of the best book-length work of folklore scholarship for the year.

What Folklorists Do

Professional Possibilities in Folklore Studies

Edited by Timothy Lloyd

Published by: Indiana University Press

What can you do with a folklore degree? Over six dozen folklorists, writing from their own experiences, show us.

What Folklorists Do examines a wide range of professionals—both within and outside the academy, at the beginning of their careers or holding senior management positions—to demonstrate the many ways that folklore studies can shape and support the activities of those trained in it. As one of the oldest academic professions in the United States and grounded in ethnographic fieldwork, folklore has always been concerned with public service and engagement beyond the academy. Consequently, as this book demonstrates, the career applications of a training in folklore are many—advocating for local and national causes; shaping public policy; directing and serving in museums; working as journalists, publishers, textbook writers, or journal editors; directing national government programs or being involved in historic preservation; teaching undergraduate and graduate students; producing music festivals; pursuing a career in politics; or even becoming a stand-up comedian.

A comprehensive guide to the range of good work carried out by today's folklorists, What Folklorists Do is essential reading for folklore students and professionals and those in positions to hire them.

Advancing Folkloristics

Edited by Jesse A. FivecoateKristina Downs and Meredith A. E. McGriff

Published by: Indiana University Press

An unprecedented number of folklorists are addressing issues of class, race, gender, and sexuality in academic and public spaces in the US, raising the question: How can folklorists contribute to these contemporary political affairs? Since the nature of folkloristics transcends binaries, can it help others develop critical personal narratives?

Advancing Folkloristics covers topics such as queer, feminist, and postcolonial scholarship in folkloristics. Contributors investigate how to apply folkloristic approaches in nonfolklore classrooms, how to maintain a folklorist identity without a "folklorist" job title, and how to use folkloristic knowledge to interact with others outside of the discipline. The chapters, which range from theoretical reorientations to personal experiences of folklore work, all demonstrate the kinds of work folklorists are well-suited to and promote the areas in which folkloristics is poised to expand and excel.

Advancing Folkloristics presents a clear picture of folklore studies today and articulates how it must adapt in the future.

Dressing with Purpose

Belonging and Resistance in Scandinavia

Edited by Carrie Hertz

Published by: Indiana University Press

Dress helps us fashion identity, history, community, and place. Dress has been harnessed as a metaphor for both progress and stability, the exotic and the utopian, oppression and freedom, belonging and resistance. Dressing with Purpose examines three Scandinavian dress traditions—Swedish folkdräkt, Norwegian bunad, and Sámi gákti—and traces their development during two centuries of social and political change across northern Europe.

By the 20th century, many in Sweden worried about the ravages of industrialization, urbanization, and emigration on traditional ways of life. Norway was gripped in a struggle for national independence. Indigenous Sámi communities—artificially divided by national borders and long resisting colonial control—rose up in protests that demanded political recognition and sparked cultural renewal. Within this context of European nation-building, colonial expansion, and Indigenous activism, traditional dress took on special meaning as folk, national, or ethnic minority costumes—complex categories that deserve reexamination today.

Through lavishly illustrated and richly detailed case studies, Dressing with Purpose introduces readers to individuals who adapt and revitalize dress traditions to articulate who they are, proclaim personal values and group allegiances, strive for sartorial excellence, reflect critically on the past, and ultimately, reshape the societies they live in.

Journals

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The Journal of Folklore Research, provides an international forum for current theory and research among scholars of traditional cultures. Each issue includes articles of theoretical interest to folklore and ethnomusicology as international disciplines, as well as essays that address the fieldwork experience and the intellectual history of folklore. Contributors include scholars and professionals in such additional fields as anthropology, area studies, communication, cultural studies, history, linguistics, literature, performance studies, religion, and semiotics.

Open Access Journals from Scholar Works

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Anthropology of East Europe Review is a biannual open-access journal of scholarship on Eastern Europe, Russia, the Balkans, and Central Asia. Its mission is to showcase fresh, up-to-date research and to help build a community of scholars who focus on the region.

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Museum Anthropology Review is a peer-reviewed journal committed to the advancement of museum and material culture studies. Working at the intersection of museum anthropology, museum ethnology, and museum-based folklore studies, MAR also publishes work in adjacent disciplines concerned with material culture and museums, including vernacular architecture studies, archaeology, linguistic anthropology, religious studies, museum studies, cultural history, non-western art history, and ethnomusicology. Founded to pioneer new approaches to scholarly communication and to ensure that research subjects and source communities have access to scholarly work that is of special concern to them, MAR is an open access journal that does not charge fees to either authors or readers. While primarily publishing in English, MAR aims to contribute to, and bridge, diverse global traditions of work in its fields, thus the editorial team and publisher endeavor, when possible, to publish in other languages as well.

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