Award Winning Titles

Indiana University Press is proud that our books have received over 60 awards (and counting!) during the 2020-2021 calendar year. Many congratulations to our well-deserving authors!

Award-Winning Books

Entwined Homelands, Empowered Diasporas

Winner: Gad Barzilai Early Career Award

Entwined Homelands, Empowered Diasporas

Hispanic Moroccan Jews and Their Globalizing Community

Aviad Moreno

Entwined Homelands, Empowered Diasporas explores how the 30,000 Jews in northern Morocco developed a sense of kinship with modern Spain, medieval Sepharad, and the broader Hispanophone world that was unlike anything experienced elsewhere. The Hispanic Moroccan Jewish diaspora, as this group is often called by its scholars and its community leaders, also became one of the most mobile and globally dispersed North African groups in the twentieth century, with major hubs in Venezuela, Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Spain, Israel, Canada, France, and the US, among others.

Drawing on an array of communal sources from across this diaspora, Aviad Moreno explores how narratives of ancestry in Spain, Israel, Morocco, and several Latin American countries interconnected the diaspora, empowering its hubs across the globe throughout the twentieth century and beyond.

By investigating these mechanisms of diaspora formation in a small community that once shared the same space in Morocco,Entwined Homelands, Empowered Diasporas challenges national accounts of the broader Jewish diasporas and adds complexity to the annals of multilayered ethnic communities on the move.

Words and Silences

Short-listed: Pushkin House Book Prize

Words and Silences

Nenets Reindeer Herders and Russian Evangelical Missionaries in the Post-Soviet Arctic

Laur Vallikivi

Words and Silences tells the story of an extraordinary group of independent Nenets reindeer herders in the northwest Russian Arctic. Under socialism these nomads managed to avoid the Soviet state and its institutions of collectivization, but soon after the atheist regime collapsed, while some staunchly resisted, many of them became fervent fundamentalist Christians.

By exploring differing concepts of how traditional and convert Nenets use and define words and of the meanings they ascribe to the withholding of speech, Laur Vallikivi shows how a local form of global Christianity has emerged through intricate negotiations of self, sociality, and cosmology.

Moving beyond studies of modernization and globalization that have all-too-predictable outcomes for indigenous peoples, Words and Silences invites us to view not only religious devotees, but words themselves, as agents of a complex and ongoing transformation.

African Cinema: Manifesto and Practice for Cultural Decolonization

Long-listed: Kraszna-Krausz Moving Image Book Award

African Cinema: Manifesto and Practice for Cultural Decolonization

Volume 1: Colonial Antecedents, Constituents, Theory, and Articulations

Michael T. Martin, Gaston Jean-Marie Kaboré, Allison J. Brown, Roy Armes, Cole Nelson, Femi Okiremuete Shaka, James Burns, Tom Rice, Odile Goerg, Med Hondo, Férid Boughedir, Haile Gerima, Sada Niang, Monique Mbeka Phoba, Olivier Barlet, Clyde R. Taylor, Férid Boughedir, Alexie Tcheuyap, Esiaba Irobi, Stephen A. Zacks, Teshome H. Gabriel, David Murphy, Jude Akudinobi, Maureen N. Eke, Paulin Soumanou Vieyra, Boukary Sawadogo, Claude Forest, Samba Gadjigo, Beti Ellerson, Joseph E. Roskos

Challenging established views and assumptions about traditions and practices of filmmaking in the African diaspora, this three-volume set offers readers a researched critique on black film.

Volume One of this landmark series on African cinema draws together foundational scholarship on its history and evolution. Beginning with the ideological project of colonial film to legitimize the economic exploitation and cultural hegemony of the African continent during imperial rule to its counter-historical formation and theorization. It comprises essays by film scholars and filmmakers alike, among them Roy Armes, Med Hondo, Fèrid Boughedir, Haile Gerima, Oliver Barlet, Teshome Gabriel, and David Murphy, including three distinct dossiers: a timeline of key dates in the history of African cinema; a comprehensive chronicle and account of the contributions by African women in cinema; and a homage and overview of Ousmane Sembène, the "Father" of African cinema.

African Cinema: Manifesto and Practice for Cultural Decolonization

Long-listed: Kraszna-Krausz Moving Image Book Award

African Cinema: Manifesto and Practice for Cultural Decolonization

Volume 2: FESPACO—Formation, Evolution, Challenges

Michael T. Martin, Gaston Jean-Marie Kaboré, Allison J. Brown, Cole Nelson, Ardiouma Soma, Gaston Jean-Marie Kaboré, Lindiwe Dovey, Manthia Diawara, Beti Ellerson, Sambolgo Bangre, Dorothee Wenner, Manthia Diawara, M. Africanus Aveh, Mahir Saul, Mbye Cham, Ousmane Sembene, Wole Soyinka, Aboubakar Sanogo, Teresa Hoefert de Turegano, Claire Andrade-Watkins, Olivier Barlet, Michael T. Martin, Rod Stoneman, Beti Ellerson, Férid Boughedir, Claire Diao, Michel Amarger, Mustapha Ouedgraogo, Colin Dupré, Sheila Petty, Imruh Bakari, June Givanni, Mahir Saul, Olivier Barlet, Rémi Abega, Rod Stoneman, Michael T. Martin, Joseph E. Roskos

Challenging established views and assumptions about traditions and practices of filmmaking in the African diaspora, this three-volume set offers readers a researched critique on black film.

Volume Two of this landmark series on African cinema is devoted to the decolonizing mediation of the Pan African Film & Television Festival of Ouagadougou (FESPACO), the most important, inclusive, and consequential cinematic convocation of its kind in the world. Since its creation in 1969, FESPACO's mission is, in principle, remarkably unchanged: to unapologetically recover, chronicle, affirm, and reconstitute the representation of the African continent and its global diasporas of people, thereby enunciating in the cinematic, all manner of Pan-African identity, experience, and the futurity of the Black World.

This volume features historically significant and commissioned essays, commentaries, conversations, dossiers, and programmatic statements and manifestos that mark and elaborate the key moments in the evolution of FESPACO over the span of the past five decades.

African Cinema: Manifesto and Practice for Cultural Decolonization

Long-listed: Kraszna-Krausz Moving Image Book Award

African Cinema: Manifesto and Practice for Cultural Decolonization

Volume 3: The Documentary Record—Declarations, Resolutions, Manifestos, Speeches

Michael T. Martin, Gaston Jean-Marie Kaboré, Allison J. Brown, Cole Nelson, Gaston Jean-Marie Kaboré, Joseph E. Roskos

Challenging established views and assumptions about traditions and practices of filmmaking in the African diaspora, this three-volume set offers readers a researched critique on black film.

Volume Three of this landmark series on African cinema spans the past century and is devoted to the documentation of decoloniality in cultural policy in both Africa and the Black diaspora worldwide. A compendium of formal resolutions, declarations, manifestos, and programmatic statements, it chronologically maps the long history and trajectories of cultural policy in Africa and the Black Atlantic. Beginning with the 1920 declaration of the Rights of the Negro Peoples of the World, which anticipates cinema as we know it today, and the formal oppositional assertions—aspirational and practical. The first part of this work references formal statements that pertain directly to cultural policy and cinematic formations in Africa, while the next part addresses the Black diaspora. Each entry is chronologically ordered to account for when the statement was created, followed by where and in what context it was enunciated.