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Creating African Fashion Histories

Politics, Museums, and Sartorial Practices

Edited by JoAnn McGregor, Heather M. Akou and Nicola Stylianou

Contributions by Jody Benjamin, Sarah Fee, Malika Kraamer, Harriet Hughes, Beth A. Buggenhagen, M. Angela Jansen, Peri M. Klemm, Erica de Greef, Edith Ojo and Helen Mears

Published by: Indiana University Press

280 Pages, 6.00 x 9.00 x 0.00 in, 81 color illus., 7 b&w illus.

This book can be purchased from this website 60 days before the publish date

  • Paperback
  • 9780253060129
  • Published: April 2022

$30.00

This book can be purchased from this website 60 days before the publish date

  • Hardcover
  • 9780253060112
  • Published: April 2022

$75.00

This book can be purchased from this website 60 days before the publish date

  • eBook
  • 9780253060136
  • Published: April 2022

$29.99

Creating African Fashion Histories examines the stark disjuncture between African self-fashioning and museum practices. Conventionally, African clothing, textiles, and body adornments were classified by museums as examples of trade goods, art, and as ethnographic—never as "fashion." Counterposing the dynamism of African fashion with museums' historic holdings thus provides a unique way of confronting ways in which coloniality persists in knowledge and institutions today. This volume breaks new ground by bringing together an interdisciplinary group of scholars and curators to debate sources and approaches for constructing African fashion histories, and to examine their potential for decolonizing museums, fashion studies and global cultural history.

Creating African Fashion Histories seeks to answer questions such as: How can researchers use museum collections to reveal traces of past self-fashioning that are obscured by racialized forms of knowledge and institutional practice? How can archival, visual, oral, ethnographic, and online sources be deployed to capture the diversity of African sartorial pasts? How can scholars and curators decolonize the Eurocentric frames of thinking encapsulated in historic collections and current curricula? Can new collections of African fashion decolonize museum practice?

From Moroccan fashion bloggers to upmarket Lagos designers, the voices in this ground-breaking collection reveal fascinating histories and geographies of circulation within and beyond the continent and its diasporic communities.