African Americans in Indianapolis

The Story of a People Determined to Be Free

by David L. Williams

Published by: Indiana University Press

248 Pages, 6.00 x 9.00 in, 80 b&w illus.

This book can be purchased from this website 60 days before the publish date

  • Paperback
  • 9780253059499
  • Published: February 2022

$20.00

This book can be purchased from this website 60 days before the publish date

  • Hardcover
  • 9780253059482
  • Published: February 2022

$60.00

This book can be purchased from this website 60 days before the publish date

  • eBook
  • 9780253059512
  • Published: February 2022

$19.99

Indianapolis has long been steeped in important moments in African American history, from businesswoman Madame C. J. Walker to the rise of the Ku Klux Klan to the founding of Crispus Attucks High School, which remained segregated throughout the 1960s.

In African Americans in Indianapolis, author and historian David L. Williams explores this sordid history by examining the daunting and horrendous historical events African Americans living in Indianapolis encountered between 1820 and 1970, as well as the community's determination to overcome these challenges. Revealing many events that have yet to be recorded in history books, textbooks, or literature, Williams chronicles the lives and careers of many influential individuals and the organizations that worked tirelessly to open doors of opportunity to the entire African American community.

African Americans in Indianapolis serves as a reminder of the advancements that Black midwestern ancestors made toward freedom and equality, as well as the continual struggle against inequalities that must be overcome.